CT - CLAVICAL

CT - CLAVICAL

CT
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CT - CLAVICAL How does CT work? CT uses X-rays to perform its work. These X-rays come from an X-ray tube which is placed inside a square machine called the gantry. The part of your body to be scanned goes inside a hole in this gantry. Why is CT such a good modality? Ordinary X-ray pictures are one-dimensional representations of body parts but CT allows us to section the body to view its inner parts. Thus, the skull X-ray only shows us the outer part, whereas CT shows us the inner parts of the brain. Where is CT useful? All parts of the body can be scanned with CT. For each part, there are specific indications or reasons for scanning. Your referring doctor and the consultant radiologist are the best judges of the usefulness of CT scanning in a specific situation and areas. Are there any dangers of CT scanning? Though X-rays involve radiation, there are no dangers, in practice. In women who are pregnant, however, CT scanning should be done after weighing all the risks. What is the injection that I may receive? Majority of the patients will be injected with a "dye" which enhances the ability of CT scans to pick up abnormalities. This is routine. The dye used is a non-ionic contrast medium, which is much safer than the routine, cheaper, ionic dyes. Are there any complications because of the "dye"? 0.5% of patients may get nausea and redness of the skin. Though severe reactions are known, these are very rare and uncommon.


Why is CT - CLAVICAL done ?

CT scans are used for a multitude of reasons:

  • They may be done to check for certain cancers in various different ways including to detect abnormal tumors, growths or lumps. They also identify the location of tumors, the stage of cancer and where to perform a biopsy
  • An arm CT scan can be used to guide doctors or surgeons during a procedure, such as a biopsy. They are important in planning for certain types of therapy and surgery, as well as in the aftermath to determine whether the patient’s body is responding to treatment
  • CT scans can be used to detect cysts or infections in the body. They can also identify the bone structures within the body and can accurately measure the density of bone
  • A CT scan is often used to quickly inspect a patient after an accident in order to identify traumatic internal injuries

CT - CLAVICAL Instructions

CCO:
Ask for the status of pregnancy in a female patient.No food intake 6 hrs prior to CT SCAN. Only liquids can be taken untill CT SCAN is done.. All the regular medications can be taken with sips of water. Ask for any history of claustrophobia.

SLAs:
For CT test scheduled before 8 AM eConsultation will be scheduled before 9 PM same day and the physical reports to be delivered by 10 PM same day
For CT test scheduled after 8 AM eConsultation to start from 8 AM next day and the physical reports to be delivered starting from 8 AM next day

FACILITATOR:
Confirm the compliance of preparations required. Ask the patient to wear comfortable clothes free of metals, zippers, hooks.

SLAs:
For CT test scheduled before 8 AM eConsultation will be scheduled before 9 PM same day and the physical reports to be delivered by 10 PM same day
For CT test scheduled after 8 AM eConsultation to start from 8 AM next day and the physical reports to be delivered starting from 8 AM next day

Why is CT - CLAVICAL ?

CT Clavicular fractures are classified by their location. The most common injury is a type 1 fracture (seen in the images below), which affects the middle third of the clavicle.
The preferred method for radiologic evaluation of clavicular fractures varies according to the location of the injury and the need to identify potential associated injuries. In general, radiography is the only modality required, and fractures of the middle third of the clavicle are seen with an isolated anteroposterior (AP) projection centered on the midshaft of the clavicle. If clinical suspicion is high and if the AP view does not reveal a fracture, a 30� cephalic view can be helpful. On the converse, radiographs are extremely difficult to interpret when injuries to the medial clavicle and the sternoclavicular (SC) joint are being evaluated, even when both sides are included or oblique views are used. Computed tomography (CT) scanning is currently the best technique to evaluate these injuries. It provides true orthogonal views, which are unobtainable with PLAIN radiography. Finally, a single AP radiograph often suffices for diagnosing distal clavicular fractures and injuries to the acromioclavicular (AC) joint. However, certain clinicians prefer to obtain comparison views of the opposite shoulder or stress images. Some believe that the value of stress, or weighted images is controversial. Use of these images has essentially been abandoned in current practice. A specialized Zanca view may help to visualize the joint by eliminating overlying structures.