X-ray - AP NECK

X-ray - AP NECK

X-Ray
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XRay - AP NECK


Why is X-ray - AP NECK done ?

A neck X-ray is used to help diagnose problems in the soft tissues of the neck. For example, symptoms such as stridor (noisy breathing), barking cough, and hoarseness may result from swelling of different areas in or near the airway. The neck X-ray can help detect a swollen epiglottis (a condition known as epiglottitis), which is rare, or swelling in the tissues around the vocal cords (croup). It can also help in diagnosing an infection in the area behind the throat (retropharyngeal abscess). It can detect signs of enlarged tonsils and adenoids, which is useful in the evaluation of kids with obstructive sleep apnea, excessive snoring, or recurrent sinus and ear infections. It also can reveal masses in the neck, such as cysts and tumors, as well as some types of objects that might have been mistakenly swallowed or inhaled and have become lodged in the upper airway or oesophagus.

The most common X-ray views are poster anterior, anteroposterior, and lateral. In an poster anterior (PA) view, the x-ray source is positioned so that the x-ray beam enters through the posterior (back) and exits out of the anterior (front), where the beam is detected. To obtain this view, the patient stands facing a flat surface behind which is an x-ray detector. In anteroposterior (AP) views, the positions of the x-ray source and detector are reversed: the x-ray beam enters through the anterior aspect and exits through the posterior aspect. AP are harder to read than PA x-rays and are therefore generally reserved for situations where it is difficult for the patient to get an ordinary chest x-ray, such as when the patient is bedridden. Lateral views are obtained in a similar fashion as the poster anterior views, except in the lateral view, the patient stands with both arms raised and the side of the chest pressed against a flat surface. Oblique view are projection taken with the central ray at an angle to any of the body planes. It is described by the angle of obliquity and the portion of the body the X-ray beam exits; right or left and posterior or anterior. Right or left as stated above indicates the portion of the body the X-ray beam exits. The axillary view is useful for detecting anterior or posterior dislocations that are not evident in the AP view.

X-ray - AP NECK Instructions

CCO:
No prior preperation is required.Ask if the patient is pregnant.

SLAs:
For XRay test scheduled before 2 PM eConsultation will be scheduled before 9 PM same day and the physical reports to be delivered by 10 PM same day
For XRay test scheduled after 2 PM eConsultation to start from 8 AM next day and the physical reports to be delivered starting from 8 AM next day

FACILITATOR:
No specific instructions

SLAs:
For XRay test scheduled before 2 PM eConsultation will be scheduled before 9 PM same day and the physical reports to be delivered by 10 PM same day
For XRay test scheduled after 2 PM eConsultation to start from 8 AM next day and the physical reports to be delivered starting from 8 AM next day

Why is X-ray - AP NECK ?

An X-ray (been used for decades) is an imaging test that uses small amounts of radiation to produce pictures of the organs, tissues and bones of the body. It can help your doctor view the inside of your body without having to make an incision. This can help them diagnose, monitor and treat many medical conditions. Different types of X-rays are used for different purposes. An X-ray AP NECK can help find the causes of common signs and symptoms such as pain, tenderness, swelling or deformity of the knee. It can also detect broken bones, dislocated joint or arthritis in the joint. After a broken bone has been set, the image can help determine whether the bone is in proper alignment and whether it has healed properly. Different parts of the body behave differently with X-rays. X-rays work because the body's tissues vary in density (thickness). Each type of tissue allows a different amount of radiation to pass through and expose the X-ray-sensitive film. For example, bones are very dense and most of the radiation is prevented from passing through to the film. As a result, bones appear white on an X-ray. Tissues that are less dense such as the lungs are filled with air and allow more of the X-rays to pass through to the film and appear on the image in shades of gray. There are some risks involved in getting an X-ray. But for most people, the potential benefits outweigh the risks.