X-Ray - AP RIGHT FEMUR

X-Ray - AP RIGHT FEMUR

X-Ray
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XRay - AP RIGHT FEMUR


Why is X-Ray - AP RIGHT FEMUR done ?

Lower limb radiography is the radiological investigation of the pelvis, hip joint, femur, knee joint, tibia, fibula, ankle joint, tarsal bones of the foot and metatarsals. A lower extremity X-ray is a test that uses radiation to produce detailed images of the bones of the lower extremity. A lower extremity X-ray may be ordered to evaluate for various injuries and conditions, including: fractures (breaks), dislocations (joints that are pulled or pushed out of their normal position), Arthritis, unexplained swelling or pain bone deformities, tumors (abnormal masses of cells), infections, assist in the detection and diagnosis of bone cancer, locate foreign objects in soft tissues around or in bones. In addition, an upper extremity X-ray may be used after treatment to ensure that a fracture has been properly aligned and stabilized for healing.

The most common X-ray views are poster anterior, anteroposterior, and lateral. In an poster anterior (PA) view, the x-ray source is positioned so that the x-ray beam enters through the posterior (back) and exits out of the anterior (front), where the beam is detected. To obtain this view, the patient stands facing a flat surface behind which is an x-ray detector. In anteroposterior (AP) views, the positions of the x-ray source and detector are reversed: the x-ray beam enters through the anterior aspect and exits through the posterior aspect. AP are harder to read than PA x-rays and are therefore generally reserved for situations where it is difficult for the patient to get an ordinary chest x-ray, such as when the patient is bedridden. Lateral views are obtained in a similar fashion as the poster anterior views, except in the lateral view, the patient stands with both arms raised and the side of the chest pressed against a flat surface. Oblique view are projection taken with the central ray at an angle to any of the body planes. It is described by the angle of obliquity and the portion of the body the X-ray beam exits; right or left and posterior or anterior. Right or left as stated above indicates the portion of the body the X-ray beam exits. The axillary view is useful for detecting anterior or posterior dislocations that are not evident in the AP view. The knee skyline Laurin view is one of many different methods to obtain an axial projection of the patella. This projection is best suited to patients able to maintain a semi-recumbent position on the examination table.

X-Ray - AP RIGHT FEMUR Instructions

CCO:
No prior preperation is required.Ask if the patient is pregnant.

SLAs:
For XRay test scheduled before 2 PM eConsultation will be scheduled before 9 PM same day and the physical reports to be delivered by 10 PM same day
For XRay test scheduled after 2 PM eConsultation to start from 8 AM next day and the physical reports to be delivered starting from 8 AM next day

FACILITATOR:
No specific instructions

SLAs:
For XRay test scheduled before 2 PM eConsultation will be scheduled before 9 PM same day and the physical reports to be delivered by 10 PM same day
For XRay test scheduled after 2 PM eConsultation to start from 8 AM next day and the physical reports to be delivered starting from 8 AM next day

Why is X-Ray - AP RIGHT FEMUR ?

X-Ray - AP RIGHT FEMUR is used to find the causes of common signs and symptoms such as suspected fracture of the thigh bone, bony tenderness of the Hip joint or chronic conditions such as osteoarthritis of Hip. After a broken bone has been set, the image can help determine whether the bone is in proper alignment and whether it has healed properly. Some of the conditions which are examined in this X ray are upper femoral fractures, avascular necrosis, acetabular fracture, hip subluxation, osteoarthritis, hip prosthesis etc.

 

The AP view is used to study the conditions both of the hip joint and also the upper part of the thigh bone.