X-ray - LAT FLEXION & EXTENTION C- SPINE

X-ray - LAT FLEXION & EXTENTION C- SPINE

X-Ray
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XRay - LAT FLEXION & EXTENTION C- SPINE


Why is X-ray - LAT FLEXION & EXTENTION C- SPINE done ?

X-rays of the spine may be performed to evaluate any area of the spine (cervical, thoracic, lumbar, sacral, or coccygeal).The spinal column is made up of 33 vertebrae that are separated by spongy disks and classified into distinct areas-The cervical area consists of 7 vertebrae in the neck, the thoracic area consists of 12 vertebrae in the chest, the lumbar area consists of 5 vertebrae in the lower back, the sacrum has 5 small, fused vertebrae and the 4 coccygeal vertebrae fuse to form 1 bone, called the coccyx or tailbone. The spinal cord, a major part of the central nervous system, is located in the vertebral canal and reaches from the base of the skull to the upper part of the lower back. The spinal cord is surrounded by the bones of the spine and a sac containing cerebrospinal fluid. The spinal cord carries sense and movement signals to and from the brain and controls many reflexes.X-rays of the spine, neck, or back may be performed to diagnose the cause of back or neck pain, fractures or broken bones, arthritis, spondylolisthesis (the dislocation or slipping of 1 vertebrae over the 1 below it),degeneration of the disks, tumors, abnormalities in the curvature of the spine like kyphosis or scoliosis, or congenital abnormalities. There may be other reasons for your health care provider to recommend an X-ray of the spine, neck, or back.

The most common X-ray views are poster anterior, anteroposterior, and lateral. In a poster anterior (PA) view, the x-ray source is positioned so that the x-ray beam enters through the posterior (back) and exits out of the anterior (front), where the beam is detected. To obtain this view, the patient stands facing a flat surface behind which is an x-ray detector. In anteroposterior (AP) views, the positions of the x-ray source and detector are reversed: the x-ray beam enters through the anterior aspect and exits through the posterior aspect. AP is harder to read than PA x-rays and is therefore generally reserved for situations where it is difficult for the patient to get an ordinary chest x-ray, such as when the patient is bedridden. Lateral views are obtained in a similar fashion as the poster anterior views, except in the lateral view, the patient stands with both arms raised and the side of the chest pressed against a flat surface. Oblique view are projection taken with the central ray at an angle to any of the body planes. It is described by the angle of obliquity and the portion of the body the X-ray beam exits; right or left and posterior or anterior. Right or left as stated above indicates the portion of the body the X-ray beam exits. The axillary view is useful for detecting anterior or posterior dislocations that are not evident in the AP view.

X-ray - LAT FLEXION & EXTENTION C- SPINE Instructions

CCO:
No prior preperation is required.Ask if the patient is pregnant.

SLAs:
For XRay test scheduled before 2 PM eConsultation will be scheduled before 9 PM same day and the physical reports to be delivered by 10 PM same day
For XRay test scheduled after 2 PM eConsultation to start from 8 AM next day and the physical reports to be delivered starting from 8 AM next day

FACILITATOR:
No specific instructions

SLAs:
For XRay test scheduled before 2 PM eConsultation will be scheduled before 9 PM same day and the physical reports to be delivered by 10 PM same day
For XRay test scheduled after 2 PM eConsultation to start from 8 AM next day and the physical reports to be delivered starting from 8 AM next day

Why is X-ray - LAT FLEXION & EXTENTION C- SPINE ?

Flexion-extension X-rays of the Cervical Spine are Dynamic motion studies of the neck.  These x-rays of the cervical spine are helpful in eliciting less than the obvious instability of the cervical spine and assessing the healing results of the cervical spine following trauma and other pathologies.Flexion-extension x-rays of the cervical spine are taken in different positions of neck i.e. flexion and extension. This is called dynamic radiography. The x-rays are then studied for relations of vertebral bodies and the preservation or loss of anatomical alignment.