X-ray - OBLIQUE LEFT SACRO ILIAC JOINT

X-ray - OBLIQUE LEFT SACRO ILIAC JOINT

X-Ray
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X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses a small amount of radiation to make an image of a person's bones. During the examination, an X-ray machine sends a beam of radiation through the pelvic region, and an image is recorded on a special X-ray film. X- Ray of the sacro iliac joint is done to look for causes for low back pain. Any injury to the sacro iliac joint can also be detected on the x-ray. What are X-rays? X-rays are electro-magnetic radiations that are produced by special machines called X-ray machines. These cannot be seen, felt or heard. How do X-rays work? Chest X-rayDifferent parts of the body behave differently with X-rays. While scanning chest X-ray , structures such as bone absorb X-rays, whereas air in the lungs lets all X-rays pass through. Thus, when X-rays pass through the body, when they come out, they have different strengths, depending on what parts of the body they have passed through. When these X-rays hit a film (like a photographic film), that film gets exposed depending upon this variation. Like a photographic film, this special film also needs to be developed, before we can see the final picture. Where are X-rays useful? X-rays have been used to view all parts of the body. Specifically, they are required for chest, all bones, joints and abdomen. Are there any dangers? Since X-rays involve radiation, there is a theoretical risk, though none in practice. In women who are pregnant, X-rays should be performed only after weighing all the risks. What are the dyes used with X-rays? X-RaysSometimes, artificial dyes are used to improve our ability to see internal structures. The common dyes used are either barium containing (barium sulphate) or iodine dyes. Barium sulphate is used for all barium examinations to study the stomach and intestines. Iodine dyes are usually injected in the veins to study the kidneys or during angiography, etc. Are there any complications of the dye? Five percent of the patients may get nausea and redness of skin. Though severe reactions are known, these are very rare and uncommon. However, in patients who have a previous history of allergy, asthmatics, those with renal and cardiac failure, a special dye is used which is more expensive but safer.


Why is X-ray - OBLIQUE LEFT SACRO ILIAC JOINT done ?

For 15% to 30% of people with long-term lower back pain, one of the sacroiliac (SI) joints, which connect the pelvis with the spine, is the source. But it’s not always easy for people or their doctors to identify the SI joint as the problem. Although the sacroiliac is one of the largest joints in your body, it’s buried deep inside your pelvis. Its location makes it hard for doctors to spot any issues during a physical exam. It can also be tough for imaging tests to capture the high-quality pictures that can show it. SI joint problems can be confused with other painful conditions, like sciatica and hip arthritis, and routine exams can't always pinpoint what’s really going on. Your doctor may also want you to have imaging tests to get pictures of the inside of your low back and pelvis. X-rays can help him look for changes in the SI joint.

The most common X-ray views are poster anterior, anteroposterior, and lateral. In a poster anterior (PA) view, the x-ray source is positioned so that the x-ray beam enters through the posterior (back) and exits out of the anterior (front), where the beam is detected. To obtain this view, the patient stands facing a flat surface behind which is an x-ray detector. In anteroposterior (AP) views, the positions of the x-ray source and detector are reversed: the x-ray beam enters through the anterior aspect and exits through the posterior aspect. AP are harder to read than PA x-rays and are therefore generally reserved for situations where it is difficult for the patient to get an ordinary chest x-ray, such as when the patient is bedridden. Lateral views are obtained in a similar fashion as the poster anterior views, except in the lateral view, the patient stands with both arms raised and the side of the chest pressed against a flat surface. Oblique view are projection taken with the central ray at an angle to any of the body planes. It is described by the angle of obliquity and the portion of the body the X-ray beam exits; right or left and posterior or anterior. Right or left as stated above indicates the portion of the body the X-ray beam exits. The axillary view is useful for detecting anterior or posterior dislocations that are not evident in the AP view.

X-ray - OBLIQUE LEFT SACRO ILIAC JOINT Instructions

CCO:
No prior preperation is required.Ask if the patient is pregnant.

SLAs:
For XRay test scheduled before 2 PM eConsultation will be scheduled before 9 PM same day and the physical reports to be delivered by 10 PM same day
For XRay test scheduled after 2 PM eConsultation to start from 8 AM next day and the physical reports to be delivered starting from 8 AM next day

FACILITATOR:
No specific instructions

SLAs:
For XRay test scheduled before 2 PM eConsultation will be scheduled before 9 PM same day and the physical reports to be delivered by 10 PM same day
For XRay test scheduled after 2 PM eConsultation to start from 8 AM next day and the physical reports to be delivered starting from 8 AM next day

Why is X-ray - OBLIQUE LEFT SACRO ILIAC JOINT ?

X-Ray oblique left  Sacro view of the sacroiliac joints can be performed in patients who cannot assume the supine position. Both sides of the sacroiliac joints are examined for comparison. Clinical indications include sacroiliitis and ankylosing spondylitis.